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Cancer - quote

The Beacon magazine

The Beacon magazine The Beacon is our free national magazine for women with breast cancer and their families and friends.
It is published quarterly, and contains stories written by women with breast cancer, news about upcoming events near you, and information on what your local Member Groups are up to. Plus, much more!
You can subscribe using our online subscription form, or via the contact details below.
Current issue This issue focuses on 'Unsung Heroes' – issue 60, Spring 2012.
Archive Past issues of The Beacon can be found in The Beacon archive.
Please be aware that some files are large and may take a while to download.
Subscribe If you would like to link up with our network across Australia and receive the national magazine, or even contribute to it, you can subscribe by contacting us:
Online: subscribe using our online subscription form
Phone: 1800 500 258
Email: beacon@bcna.org.au
It is not necessary for you to have experienced breast cancer yourself to receive The…

Pink Party raises $1.6 million to battle breast cancer

By Booth Moore and Adam Tschorn


They came wearing pink tutus, pink Converse sneakers, pink pashminas and pink hats. A fashionable crowd put on the pink Saturday night for Elyse Walker's 8th Annual Pink Party to raise money for the Cedars-Sinai women's cancer program. Hosted by actress Michelle Pfeiffer and Pacific Palisades boutique owner Elyse Walker, the night of fashion, fuchsia and fundraising resulted in channeling more than $1.6 million into the cancer program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, bringing the cumulative fundraising revenue from eight years of the event to $7.8 million. David E. KelleyLeslie MannJudd Apatow, Marcia Cross, Lisa Edelstein and Rainn Wilson were among the 850 guests who headed to Santa Monica Airport's Hangar 8 to sip pink grapefruit mojitos and watch a catwalk show featuring 80 looks from the likes of Stella McCartney, Kelly Wearstler and Bruno Cucinelli.  Justine Bateman got into the spirit by wearing a pink Tarina Tar…

Quote of day - Marilyn Monroe

Quote of the day - Life

About Avon's Breast Cancer Crusade The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade was launched in Australia in 1996 to raise funds for and increase awareness of breast cancer. Today, the Crusade covers over 50 Avon countries across the world. Globally and locally we are working together, and are proud to say that Australia and New Zealand has raised over $10M from the sale of Pink Ribbon products thanks to the efforts of its many dedicated Sales Representatives and supportive Customers. Why support breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women. Around 1 in 10 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime, and more than 30 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each day. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease, which is why early detection through mammographic screening is very important. Where do our funds go? Avon donates the funds raised to two organisations; the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (ANZBCTG), “which conducts a national breast cancer clinical trials research program for the treatment, prevention and cure of breast cancer; and the YWCA Encore Program, which provides community support, through exercise and counselling, to women who have had breast cancer surgery. Avon is the world’s No.1 fundraiser for the breast cancer cause Together, we can make a difference.

About Avon's Breast Cancer Crusade

The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade was launched in Australia in 1996 to raise funds for and increase awareness of breast cancer. Today, the Crusade covers over 50 Avon countries across the world. Globally and locally we are working together, and are proud to say that Australia and New Zealand has raised over $10M from the sale of Pink Ribbon products thanks to the efforts of its many dedicated Sales Representatives and supportive Customers.
Why support breast cancer?
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women. Around 1 in 10 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime, and more than 30 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each day. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease, which is why early detection through mammographic screening is very important.Where do our funds go?

Avon donates the funds raised to two organisations; the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trial…

Thought of the day - Marilyn Monroe

Of course they are!

Marilyn Monroe - Quote of the day

Monumental cleavage alert! Did Natalie Portman get a boob job?

Black Swan Oscar winner Natalie Portman has sparked feverish debate about whether or not she's had a boob job, after she appeared on camera at an American football game looking bustier than before.
The 31-year-old, who gave birth to son Aleph in June 2011, was watching the game in Austin, Texas during a break from shooting the as-yet-untitled new Terrence Malick film.
With co-star Michael Fassbender by her side, a newly blonde Natalie was spotted by the cameras during the ABC broadcast.
While it could very well be a push-up bra, or a consequence of breast-feeding her bub, Twitter fans immediately speculated about the star's potentially enhanced assets.
"Natalie Portman @ the Texas-Baylor game ... boob job? Looks like it!" one user wrote.
"Wait a second, did Natalie Portman get a boob job? Is she pregnant? On the sidelines of Texas game and #wow," another tweeted.
Comments on the YouTube clip ran along the same lines, albeit many of them censored, with…

Detect breast cancer early - Moonwalk


People from all walks of life holding pink balloons and banners gathered and walked together to echo to the public the importance of breast cancer prevention and early detection.
Around 3,000 participants walked from the Plaza Independencia to Fuente Osmeña Circle last Oct. 2 to observe the annual 9th Moonwalk: A Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness, an advocacy campaign of the Eduardo J. Aboitiz Cancer Center of the Ramon Aboitiz Foundation Inc. (RAFI).
Donna Diamante, 58, a cancer awareness advocate, said she hoped her participation would help push the importance of early breast cancer screening and detection.
“I dedicate my walk to myself, my children, and my mother-in-law. I have always been an advocate of breast cancer awareness. We have the option to live and fight the disease. We have to be educated and do the necessary screenings to detect breast cancer early and have it treated early as well,” Diamante, a Destiny Medical Fund representative, said.
B…

Quote of the day

Marilyn Monroe quote

What is the normal range for CA 125?

How is CA 125 measured? CA 125 is usually measured from a blood sample. It can also be measured in fluid from the chest or abdominal cavity. The tests currently in use are all based upon the use of an antibody that is directed against the CA 125 protein (monoclonal antibody technique).
In 1996, an improved version of the test was introduced and is sometimes denoted as CA 125 - II. The numerical figure of the second generation test results may be higher or lower than a first generation test. When comparing multiple test results over time, it can be important to know which method was used.

The normal values for CA 125 may vary slightly among individual laboratories. In most laboratories, the normal value is less than 35 U /ml.

What does an elevated CA 125 mean, and how is the test used? It is not possible to interpret the meaning of an abnormally high CA 125 without additional information about the particular patient being evaluated. The reason is that blood levels of this pr…

What is CA 125?

CA 125 is a protein that is a so-called tumor marker or biomarker, which is a substance that is found in greater concentration in tumor cells than in other cells of the body. In particular, CA 125 is present in greater concentration in ovarian cancer cells than in other cells. It was first identified in the early 1980s, and the function of the CA 125 protein is not currently understood. CA stands for cancer antigen.

Robin Roberts To Oprah: 'I Can't Wait To Come Back' To 'GMA' (VIDEO)

Robin Roberts called into "Good Morning America" for the first time since her bone marrow transplant over a month ago -- and she spoke to none other than guest host Oprah.
The talk show queen was one of the many big names filling in for Roberts while she recovers from her operation. She co-hosted the second hour of "GMA," taping a bit with her hair in rollers and hawking some of her favorite -- well, most-liked, at the very least -- things. ("Miracle Body Jeeeaaaaaaaaaans!") She also played "Twitterpiece Theatre," reading out some of her tweets with the help of Joy Behar.
But the centerpiece of the hour was Roberts' call.
"You have lifted my spirits," she told Oprah.
"How are you?" Oprah asked.
"It's day 35 ... and it is a journey, my friend. I am so incredibly blessed to be doing as well as I am. Sometimes I feel incredibly old, and I can't get my head off the pillow, but those days are becoming f…

PINK POWER CHARGED: THE MCGRATH FOUNDATION SPREADS LEARNINGS BEYOND BORDERS

From Perth to Prague, it’s been a busy few months for the McGrath Foundation as it continues on its mission to place McGrath Breast Care Nurses in communities right across Australia. This vision which includes offering support to breast care nurses nationally by equipping them with the latest training and development tools is now set to be recognised nationally and was recently applauded globally.

The Sydney International Breast Cancer Congress (SIBCC) taking place 23 to 26 October, will see McGrath Clinical Nurse Educator, Kim Kerin-Ayres, attending not only as a member of the programme committee, but also as  a Chair of the Breast Care Nurse Symposium, a day sponsored by the McGrath Foundation.

The congress, hosted by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute (BCI), is the leading multidisciplinary conference for breast cancer health, research, treatment and care in Australia. It is an opportunity for all health professionals caring for women with breast cancer and everyon…

Thought of the day

How do you become the person with Cancer in peoples eyes

Yes I have had cancer twice. Most only knew about my last battle. My book will come out this year and you will get a bigger look at what I have been through.

One of my friends father's a lovely man. He has heard about me for 18 years. All kinds of things. I met him last year at my friends mothers funeral. My friend said "this is Nina" he said oh yes the one with cancer!!!!!

Really I have so many things to be remembered for

I am:

A mother
A friend
A sister
A sailor
A funeral Director
An author
A daughter
A cousin
A dancer
A helper
A public speaker

But he remembered me the one with cancer and you know what I don't have it. I am in remission, but that's all he could see...........

Thought of the day!

Genetic Counselling Services

I lost my mother in 1999 to lost system. I wonder why the health system failed her. A mother's love is amazing, it's a power pact relationship of support. A love so strong you are never alone or afraid A love so strong you are never judged or condemned.
A light that shines brightly and a support system so strong.
I thought I would have a heart attack and die when I found my mother in a coma. It seemed it was the end at 53. A life cut so short. We had little notice. Seemed the end was one week away.
I watched her die in front of my eyes. It was horrible. The weird thing about cancer is it has no path, it strikes with out warning taking those whom we love.
We have a cancer gene, we did not know. Can I say ask questions and know you family history. I have mapped out for my children the family health tree. It wont change my destiny but it lets everyone know what to watch out for. It's important! Know what's in your past..

Our cancer gene goes back 6 generations on my gran…