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Testicular Cancer - awareness

At a party one night in all the cheers and all the happiness of being together, I see a vulnerable husband.
My friends husbands are great and I life seeing my friends happy, what I also love is that men get as scared about cancer as us ladies do,  I may be wrong but maybe they don't have the same resources we do,  the coffees the sharing Journies etc.
so my friends husband tells me he has only one testicle. He talks about a scarey voyage as we share voyages, also just to put something amazing on this they are both happy on there second marriages. Also they have had a child. So that's fantastic news that you can come through a scarey battle, still produce. So look here is what we spoke of:



What are the symptoms of testicular cancer?

A hard lump in either testis is the usual symptom of testicular cancer. The lump is usually painless but in about one in 10 men it is painful or tender. In a few men, constant backache, coughing or breathlessness, and enlarged or tender nipples may mean that the cancer has spread. A man with any of these symptoms should see a doctor straight away; however, there may be many other reasons for these symptoms.

What is testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer starts as an abnormal growth or tumour in a testis. A cancer will usually appear as a painless lump in a testis. If a man sees a doctor as soon as a lump, swelling or pain in a testis is noticed, the cancer can remain localised (remain within the testis). However, if not treated, the cancer typically spreads to other parts of the body via the blood or lymphatic system. Testicular cancer has a very good cure rate (about 95 per cent).

Can I do anything to prevent testicular cancer?

As the causes of testicular cancer are largely unknown, there are no known ways to prevent it.
There is no evidence that injury or sporting strains, life-style (for example smoking or diet), or sexual activity are linked with testicular cancer. However, an injury to the groin area may sometimes prompt men to check or notice a problem with the testes that needs further investigation by a doctor.
Heath history does it help? 
Anything that increases the chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for testicular cancer include:
  • Having had an undescended testicle.
  • Having had abnormal development of the testicles.
  • Having a personal history of testicular cancer.
  • Having a family history of testicular cancer (especially in a father or brother).
  • Being white.
Male Illustration - Testicular Cancer
Male Illustration - Testicular Cancer
#seeyourdoctor #testicles #testicularcancer #iamstillawoman #myjourney 

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